English
The new Mercedes-Benz Citaro regular-service bus
19.06.2011 - 01:01

German version

The new Mercedes-Benz Citaro regular-service bus
  • Completely redeveloped model to gradually replace the global bestseller
  • Cheerful design makes it even more attractive
  • A string of measures to further increase economy
  • New interior styling and lighting for excellent passenger comfort
  • Debut of ESP in low-floor vehicles/urban buses
  • New cockpit sets new standards for operation and comfort


The new Mercedes-Benz Citaro with 2 doors, Mercedes-Benz Citaro G and the new Mercedes-Benz Citrao with 3 doors

After selling over 31,000 units during 13 years of ongoing development, the world’s undisputed best-selling urban regular-service bus is about to extend its lead with the debut of a brand new Mercedes-Benz Citaro. The new model builds on the numerous strengths of its predecessor. Transport operators, passengers and drivers alike all stand to gain from the superlative qualities of a regular-service bus that has not only been designed for uncompromising economy, comfort and safety, but boasts smart, sophisticated looks too. Numerous innovations can be found throughout the bus, from the front bumper all the way back to the tail lights. Transport companies benefit from the further improvements in economy, passengers can look forward to even greater comfort and an unrivalled level of safety, while drivers will find an all-new workstation awaiting them. The new Mercedes-Benz Citaro continues in the tradition of its predecessor by setting a further milestone in bus and coach development.

The new Citaro: more stylish than ever

The face of urban and suburban bus transport has now taken on an even more cheerful aspect. The arrival of the Citaro in 1997 marked the end of the era of box-shaped regular-service buses with a sober, purely functional design, and this same approach has been consistently adopted for the all-new design of the new model, which has undergone complete redevelopment from tip to tail. The “face” of the new Citaro, with its large headlamp assemblies and curved windscreen, has a genial, cheerful expression. The deep side windows radiate transparency, while distinctive wheel arches symbolise dynamism. The new Citaro uses curves to great effect at the rear end too, also giving it a sophisticated, likeable feel. This all makes it something of an ambassador for an attractive form of public passenger transport.


The new Mercedes-Benz Citaro with 2 doors.

The new Citaro in detail: cheerful and distinctive design

The new Citaro face that retains the characteristic A-zero pillars in the front end is especially eye-catching. The new Citaro greets passengers with a friendly smile. The large almond-shaped headlamps and, above all, the rounded forms of the front end help to rid the Citaro of the austere appearance that is so typical of regular-service buses with their space-maximising, box-shaped bodies.


The new Mercedes-Benz Citaro with 3 doors.

Design elements produce an unmistakable silhouette

As the driver’s workstation in the new Citaro has been raised by 60 mm, the windscreen and destination display have been moved upwards too. The vehicle body height has remained unchanged though, so the A-zero pillars on the new Citaro now merge elegantly into a three-dimensional lateral design element on the roof. This conceals both the raised ridge of the destination display and any further superstructures fitted on the roof, while also giving the new Citaro an unmistakable silhouette. The front end’s higher front fascia now includes a notch for the windscreen wiper linkage. At the bottom, the front section ends in a new, more rounded bumper.

Slight increase in wheelbase and front overhang

As a result of the extended front overhang (+ 100 mm) and longer wheelbase (+ 55 mm), the rigid version of the Citaro has increased in length from 11,950 to 12,105 mm compared to its predecessor. The Citaro’s modular design concept means that the extra length is transferred to the articulated Citaro G model too. The increase in wheelbase size is a result of the larger installation space required for the drive units of future Euro VI versions. The new wheelbase furthermore makes all seating variants possible, just as the current model does. The increase in the length of the front overhang was prompted by design requirements and by the inclusion of a new crash element to give the driver added protection in a collision.


The new Mercedes-Benz Citaro with 2 doors.

Harmonious and practical styling of the front section

At the same time, the enlarged overhang presents an excellent opportunity to move away from the angular basic shape of conventional urban regular-service buses. Apart from adding to the bus’s overall length, the extension of the front section also provides the basis for the harmonious and rounded design of the new Citaro’s front. With a view to preserving the still unsurpassed manoeuvrability of the Citaro, however, the distance from the A-zero pillars and the corner bumpers to the front axle remains unchanged despite the front end’s extra length. This means that in practice, the front end does not swing out any further in bends and when manoeuvring.

The bumper is split into three sections for greater ease of repair. There are now new shoe-shaped scuffing protectors on the left and right in front of the hem sections to prevent the overhang of the Citaro from being damaged should it come into contact with the ground, e.g. when performing tight manoeuvres close to the kerb. The scuffing protectors can be simply replaced.

The Citaro Ü features an elegant windscreen similar to a touring coach

Mercedes-Benz continues to employ a design that differentiates the urban and rural regular-service versions of the new Citaro from the front. Whereas the destination display on the urban regular-service bus still juts forward between the two A-zero pillars from above the windscreen to make it easier to read, the Citaro Ü for rural regular-service routes is fitted with a high windscreen which covers the destination display too. The extended front end means that the glass has a more pronounced three-dimensional convex form, whose elegant curvature is highly reminiscent of the windscreens on luxury touring coaches.


New lighting technology with daytime running lamps and low beam, plus bi-xenon

The new H7 headlamps generate an impressively high light output from their large reflectors. The new optional LED daytime running lamps are integrated into the headlamp assemblies along with the LED indicators. Not only do these increase safety, they help to make the new Citaro unmistakable out on the road too. The list of options also includes bi-xenon headlamps, which are just as distinctive, as well as front fog lamps with an integrated cornering light function.

Side windows set 120 mm deeper than before

The expansive glazing along the flanks of the new Citaro is particularly striking. The side window line is set 120 mm deeper than before, which gives the regular-service bus a transparent appearance. The three-dimensional styling of the glass-fibre-reinforced-plastic wheel arches at the front and rear, combined with the way they extend upwards as far as the window line, gives the body of the new Citaro a dynamic and exciting look. The wheel arches are elastic in nature, which prevents damage being caused by minor knocks, while also reducing weight.

The waist line on the left-hand side rises up gracefully at the rear, before terminating in the corner pillar above the wraparound tail lights. For ease of repair, the sidewall continues to be divided into different segments. The lightweight aluminium side panelling now wraps around the hem section at the bottom, increasing corrosion protection and producing an enclosed design without any breaks.


The new Mercedes-Benz Citaro with 2 doors.

A new rear end for the Citaro

The designers have also given the rear of the Citaro an overhaul, with new features including the engine compartment flap and the corner pillars with their rounded corner bumpers. While an indentation on the engine compartment flap echoes the front’s smiling expression, the rounded corner bumpers blend perfectly into the design concept of the new Citaro, and are highly reminiscent of a touring coach in appearance. Thanks to the highly elastic structure of the corner bumpers, they can absorb light knocks without becoming misshapen.


Safe, weight-optimised construction

A number of decisive advances have also taken place out of sight beneath the attractive exterior of the new Citaro. Although the bodyshell continues to be based on the proven technique of annular frame members – one of the innovations from the first-generation Citaro – it has been made even more rigid to afford passengers yet greater protection in a side-on collision.

Intelligent engineering lowers weight while increasing strength

A series of individual measures have been implemented to give the bodyshell superior strength despite its lower weight. One example is the newly designed pressed sheet-metal parts on the new Citaro, which combine the horizontal and vertical bodyshell elements around the window posts into a single multi-dimensional section resembling the hilt of a sword. Because they are built from a single pressed part, they are both lighter and stronger. Shifting the laser welding further out from the joints has produced a very sturdy connection. The developers have achieved similar results with the new castings for the door portals: although they have been reinforced, their walls are thinner, making them lighter than the previous design.

The expansive glazing on the new Citaro is lighter in many parts too: partially reducing the glass thickness from 4.0 to 3.15 mm compensates for the larger windows’ greater initial weight.


Green components above the doors: Cast corners in thin-wall cast steel. Help to reduce weight and optimise strength. - Green components between the axles: Laser-welded stampings. Help to reduce weight and optimise strength. - Red components in the front section: Reinforcement measures in accordance with ECE R 29 (pendulum impact)

The roof frame is also new: it is based on two longitudinal hoops running almost the entire length, and now weighs just 110 kg on the 12 m rigid bus compared to the previous 137 kg – without sacrificing stability in any way. This new construction furthermore allows flexible positioning of any superstructures on the roof, while also reducing the number of different variants from over 50 to just 15.

New crash element to protect the driver in a collision

An outstanding safety feature that has been integrated into the extended front end of the new Citaro is a crash element to provide additional collision protection. This, together with the strengthened A-zero pillars and a frame design that has been engineered to channel impact forces directly into the substructure, means that the new Citaro already fulfils the requirements of the future pendulum impact test for coaches as laid down in the European ECE R29 standard.


Red components in the front section: Reinforcement measures in accordance with ECE R 29 (pendulum impact).

The Citaro already complies with future ECE standards today

The bodyshell of the new Citaro was developed with the future ECE R 66/01 standard in mind too. This specifies a much larger survival space for the interior in the event of the vehicle tipping over than was previously the case. Although the new regulations only come into force in 2017, the new Citaro already complies with them today.

Considerable reduction of load on rear axle

The 55 mm increase in wheelbase length to 5900 mm together with the repositioning of the batteries underneath the driver’s area on rigid vehicles has produced a significant shift in weight, so reducing the load on the rear axle. The leverage effect of the batteries’ new location alone relieves the rear axle of 171 kg of weight. The resulting gain in axle load capacity at the rear is required in anticipation of future exhaust legislation and the heavier assemblies that will need to be fitted in the rear overhang as a consequence. The batteries are furthermore perfectly accessible in their side-by-side arrangement. In the articulated Citaro G, the batteries remain in their previous position on a level with the centre axle, where weight is not a critical consideration.


The new Mercedes-Benz Citaro with 2 doors.

No heavier despite larger body

Despite the extra body length, the considerable increase in window surface area at the sides and the further major improvements to impact protection on the Euro V version, the new Mercedes-Benz Citaro is lighter overall than its predecessor. At the same time, passenger capacities are at least the same as before – a key criterion for transport operators’ profitability calculations.

Flexible and reliable electrics with PCB architecture

The central electrical compartment in the form of a cabinet behind the driver has also been redesigned. The new electrical system with PCB (printed circuit board) architecture is highly flexible and extremely reliable. It can be easily equipped for additional equipment and is very clearly arranged, resulting in good accessibility for maintenance work too. This dispenses with a great deal of complicated wiring and means there are fewer variants too.

Further improving reliability and durability was also the reason for rerouting cables from the underbody area so that they pass underneath the roof in the interior of the new Citaro, where they are safely protected from environmental influences. It was also possible to reduce the number of attachment points by half in the process, with standardised clips now being used mostly instead of bolts. Cable routing plays a particularly important role in the articulated bus. The switch from the previous S-shaped to the new C-shaped arrangement for routing electrical cables across the articulated section increases operational reliability.

practical and inviting interior

The Citaro already set new standards when it was first launched in 1997, with a passenger compartment that was as cheerful as it was practical. The new Citaro follows in this tradition by setting another milestone in the development of regular-service buses with a multitude of innovations.

New doors save weight and increase strength

The new inward-swinging doors, manufactured in-house, have a lightweight, low-maintenance design, and feature an optimised rubber seal at the bottom for a snug fit when closed. The new sealing concept produces a virtually air-tight seal around the doors, largely eliminating wind noise in the vehicle interior in the process. The new doors stand out for their low weight, sturdy frames and highly accurate fit. The door leaves are individually controllable and are operated separately. Alternatively, the Citaro can be equipped with a new pivot-and-slide door at the front entrance too, which is available exclusively for the Citaro. This door is inclined slightly outwards as it slides forwards, allowing it to pass the nearside exterior mirror without touching it. The characteristics of the new pivot-and-slide door likewise include low weight and high stability.

Lower, well-illuminated entrances

The passenger compartment of the new Citaro has a particularly inviting feel to it. The pleasant experience for passengers begins at the bus stop thanks to the use of broad LED light strips to light up the entrance and exit areas brightly at all doors, both inside and outside the bus. A large plaque bearing the brand logo and lettering, which is integrated into the new door leading to the driver's cab, lets all passengers know as soon as they step on board the new Citaro that they are taking a seat in a Mercedes-Benz.

Sophisticated lighting technology for increased comfort and safety

The new Citaro’s passenger compartment stands out for its bright and cheerful design. This applies to both the colour scheme and the interior lighting concept. The ceiling lamps have multidimensional lenses, meaning their light doesn't just shine down directly, but also reflects off the roof hatches to produce an indirect lighting effect. LED bulbs can be fitted in place of the standard fluorescent tubes as an option. In future, it will be possible to have extra light fittings installed around the edge of the ceiling. This lighting technology can be used to create quiet zones and reading corners within the seating area. The good lighting levels will have the additional effect of reducing the risk of vandalism at the rear of the bus.

Lighting units that can be integrated into the new grab rails on the Citaro are likewise available. The upright grab rails basically feature the same outward-curving shape taken from the predecessor, which served as a model solution for the entire industry. The new uniform distribution achieved by attaching the grab rails to a continuous overhead section to form just two lines gives the interior a more orderly appearance. Straight grab rails are fitted at the front. They are positioned further apart here, giving passengers boarding the bus the impression of more space. The horizontal grab rails are now mounted in front of the vertical rails, which also has the effect of giving the passenger compartment a more tranquil appearance and creates a line for the eye to follow when looking around the interior.

Innovative grab rails with advertising and lighting

The horizontal grab rails are made from extruded aluminium sections and are oval in section. This, together with their larger diameter, makes them particularly easy to grip. The new shape furthermore allows lighting elements as well as exchangeable advertising inserts with clip fasteners to be integrated into the grab rails, paving the way for a brand new form of advertising. The new, wraparound stop-request buttons are easier to find, especially for passengers with impaired vision.


The partition behind the driver’s cab as well as the outer ceiling flaps can now be used as advertising space too. There is also the option of route displays which can be integrated into the outer ceiling sections. Pre-fittings for monitors with a 48.26 cm or 55.88 cm screen diagonal are furthermore provided behind the cross-duct and in the rear section of the bus for information and advertising purposes.

Compact air-conditioning system lowers procurement and running costs

Mercedes-Benz now offers the Citaro rigid bus with a new compact air-conditioning system as an additional option to bridge the gap between the familiar ventilation and air-conditioning systems. It takes the form of individual independent units, which are positioned over the roof hatches and do not require any additional cabling other than for supplying power. Thanks to its slight cooling effect combined with uniform movement of the air, the system can maintain a comfortable interior climate at average summer temperatures for Central Europe. The system is regulated according to the outside temperature. Both procurement and running costs are lower than with a conventional air-conditioning system, where the high cooling capacity is attained regardless of the exterior temperature. The refrigeration capacity is 3.8 kW per unit.

The proven seating concept has been retained

The new Citaro has adopted the previous model’s proven seating concept with cantilever mounting. The seats are manufactured in-house. The City Star Eco version is fitted as standard in urban buses, while the Citaro Ü comes equipped with the Inter Star Eco rural-service seat, in view of the longer time that tends to be spent in the vehicle. There are many different variants to choose from for both the seating design and the arrangement of the seats in the passenger compartment.


Driver’s workstation with perfected ergonomics

The developers have completely remodelled the driver’s workstation, and the cockpit now takes ease of operation, ergonomics, instrumentation and comfort to new heights for regular-service buses.

A new driver’s door leads into the cockpit area

Even the door to the driver's cab has been redesigned. The door is now hinged at the rear and opens from the front, allowing drivers to move in a straight line between the front door and their workstation for particularly fast entry and exit. The developers also took the opportunity to improve the stowage facilities in the door. Drivers will now find a larger compartment for their bag, for example, as well as an extra compartment for a drinks bottle. The partition screen for the driver’s cab has been given a new look too, and is now larger and curves further forward. Instead of the grab rail previously fitted at the front of the partition screen, there is now a grab handle on the side.

For the first time, the new Citaro can be factory-fitted with another new development – an optional driver protection door. This door has a modular design based on the standard door. Depending on requirements, a number of variants are available, which offer graduated levels of protection by forming a screen between driver and passengers.

At eye level with passengers

The driver’s seating position has been altered too. The height of the driver’s pedestal and seat has been increased by 60 mm altogether. This gives the driver the psychological advantage of being at eye level with the passengers boarding. At the same time, the raised seating position affords a better all-round view, for example of the traffic in front. To maintain the exemplary view outwards and upwards, the windscreen has likewise been raised by 60 mm. The destination display, meanwhile, has been moved up by a whole 72 mm, for even better visibility when looking up and to the side, for example at traffic lights. The lowering of the window sill at the side is also beneficial to the driver. The development team has made the pedals more ergonomic to operate too.

Attractive instrument panel, handy steering-wheel control pad

The completely newly developed instrument panel in the new Citaro meets the specifications of the Association of German Transport Operators in terms of both its construction and adjustability, as does the steering wheel. However, the developers have succeeded in creating considerably more knee room and foot room for the driver with the new, elegant design. The upper section’s light-grey colour adds to the cheerful, welcoming impression.

The cockpit comprises large, clearly arranged dials for road speed and engine speed, with a grey background. The strip of indicator and warning lamps between the two dials has now been replaced by a colour display showing a multitude of supplementary information.




The display is operated using the standard control pad on the new steering wheel. The two-dimensional menu navigation is very clearly structured, and also allows basic operation of the radio or two-way radio, for example. The steering wheel, its control pad, as well as the colour display, are the same as those fitted in the current range of Mercedes-Benz touring coaches.

Logically arranged switches and buttons

The buttons and switches in the Citaro’s cockpit have been repositioned based on the latest ergonomic findings. As a result, the lower array of switches on the driver’s right-hand side (on left-hand-drive vehicles) consists solely of the door-control buttons that are in constant use in daily operation. The control buttons for the automatic transmission, which are generally used less frequently, are now positioned further forward in a separate horizontal strip. The location of the light switch is also worth noting – it continues to be placed on the left of the cockpit, but no longer on the front face of the instrument panel. Not only does the new prominent position much further forward make the switch easily accessible, but the driver also has the switch setting in their field of vision at all times. The repositioning also frees up extra legroom.


The new Citaro is prepared for all eventualities. The regular-service bus’s instrument panel has been constructed so sturdily that it can support additional items of apparatus on both left and right, each weighing up to 2.5 kg. Mounting adapters as well as cable bushings can be factory-fitted as special equipment for this purpose, allowing customer-specific equipment to be integrated far more neatly than before.

Clean, fuel-efficient drive and innovative assistance systems

The engines for the new Mercedes-Benz Citaro are based on BlueTec diesel technology. The wide-ranging choice of engines for the Citaro covers the full spectrum of power requirements. The OM 906 hLA turbocharged diesel engine is a particularly compact and lightweight six-cylinder unit with a displacement of 6.37 litres, an output of 210 kW (286 hp) and a maximum torque of 1120 Nm. Alternatively, there is the OM 457 hLA six-cylinder engine with a 12 l displacement in a choice of two power ratings: 220 kW (299 hp) and 260 kW (354 hp) with maximum torques of 1250 Nm and 1600 Nm respectively. All of the engine variants stand out for their high pulling power from low rev speeds. This is of particular importance for enabling the bus to pull away dynamically in city traffic, even when full to capacity.

EEV emissions rating even without particulate filter

All engines are Euro V compliant as standard. The engines can furthermore be specified in a version that meets the most stringent voluntary emissions standard that currently exists – the EEV (Enhanced Environmentally-friendly Vehicle) standard. The new Citaro achieves EEV compliance by means of internal engine measures alone without the need for a particulate filter – further evidence of the enormous potential of the efficient, eco-friendly BlueTec diesel technology and its viability for the future. EEV with no filter means reduced costs for procurement as well as maintenance. Further benefits include the lower kerb weight and reduced space requirements, which in turn increases the number of seats. A particulate filter can, of course, be installed as an option.


Power transmission is handled by fully automatic torque-converter transmissions made by Voith and ZF. The most up-to-date versions of both are fitted in the Citaro to maximise efficiency. With a choice of engine, transmission and matching final drive ratio, the new Citaro takes to the road with a customised drivetrain, just as its predecessor did.

Further reduction in fuel consumption

A new, electronically controlled air compressor is employed on the articulated Citaro bus with the vertically mounted OM 457 LA engine. This is an EAPU (Electronic Air Processing Unit) that combines the compressed-air drier, pressure governor, four-circuit safety valve and pressure sensors into a single component. The compact construction simplifies assembly and reduces the number of lines required. Where possible, the electronically controlled air compressor operates when the Citaro G is in overrun mode to save fuel. To ensure this is the case as often as possible, the system pressure for the suspension and door operation has been increased from 10 to 13 bar with the introduction of the new air compressor. This produces greater air reserves in day-to-day operation and saves fuel.

Detailed improvements to comfort suspension

The chassis on the new Mercedes-Benz Citaro again excels with exceptional comfort and handling safety thanks to its independent front suspension. In this respect too though, the new Citaro has now gone one better, especially from the driver’s point of view. The reworked steering has improved steering-wheel return, for instance – a key consideration for urban regular-service buses which have to turn so frequently.

Supreme safety levels thanks to innovative assistance system

A new assistance system is making its debut in the low-floor bus and in the Citaro simultaneously: for the first time, the Electronic Stability Program (ESP) is available for an urban regular-service bus. The Mercedes‑Benz Citaro is taking safety technology for urban regular-service buses into a new era with this innovative feature – thereby emulating its predecessor, which also set new benchmarks on its launch.

Simplified, cost-effective maintenance and repair

A substantial reduction in running costs was one of the clear specifications for the development of the new Citaro. An ambitious objective, as the Citaro was already an exceptionally economical urban bus as it was. Development work focused on the maintenance costs. With the launch of the new model, the maintenance intervals for the automatic transmission and rear axle have now been extended from 120,000 km to 180,000 km. The smaller details help to cut costs too: the air intake for ventilating the driver’s cab is now fitted with larger filters, which have longer replacement intervals.


Risk of damage from minor knocks greatly reduced

The repair of the typical minor damage sustained by urban buses in hectic traffic also generates costs, however. This was another point the developers turned their attention to. The front overhang features shoe-shaped scuffing protectors made from glass-fibre-reinforced plastic with a bolt-on, replaceable design. These protect the hem profiles of the bus when drawing into bus stops or swinging out over embankments, as can occur on rural-service routes, for example. The flexible bumper corners made from elastic glass-fibre-reinforced plastic on the rear bumper and wheel arches also help to lower repair costs.

LED lighting reduces power consumption and lasts longer

The numerous LED lights on both the inside and the outside of the new Citaro bring about a noticeable reduction in power consumption. They furthermore generally last for as long as a bus’s service life, largely doing away with the need to carry out tedious, time-consuming minor jobs like replacing faulty bulbs for the whole of the Citaro’s lifecycle.

Numerous other details likewise help to further reduce the amount of maintenance work required. There is now a sensor to measure the battery’s voltage, for instance, which works together with a controller to keep the voltage at a consistently high level, increasing battery life significantly. The capacity of the windscreen washer reservoir behind the front fascia has been increased from 8 to 20 litres as part of the model change, reducing to a minimum the frequency with which the washer fluid has to be topped up.

The new Citaro: launching with rigid and articulated buses

Mercedes-Benz will be phasing in the high-volume model versions of the new Citaro over the course of 2011. The focus will be on urban and rural variants with a length of 12 metres and 2 or 3 doors, as well as the urban and rural versions of the articulated Citaro bus with 3 or 4 doors. The buses are driven by horizontal or vertical diesel engines from the OM 906 and OM 457 series in the familiar versions and power ratings. Further variants of the new Citaro will follow in 2012. The new Mercedes-Benz Citaro has been future-proofed, with all installation spaces already prepared for the future Euro VI emissions standard. The corresponding drive units will be launched at a later time. This progressive switch to the new model generation guarantees thorough testing of all versions, high quality, plus a continuous supply of vehicles without any disruption to customer deliveries. The complete range of new Mercedes-Benz Citaro models, including all rigid and articulated variants, the low-entry Citaro LE as well as the CapaCity, is due to become available over the course of 2012/2013.




New Citaro, 2 doors
in urban and rural-service versions

- Technical data -

Length:12,105 mm
Width:2550 mm
Height:3009 mm to 3180 mm
(according to specification)
Passenger capacity
total:
104 to 106 (depending on version,
vertically/horizontally mounted engine)
of which seated:26 or 32
of which standing:78 or 74
Engine - horizontally
mounted::
OM 906 hLA, 210 kW (286 hp),
Euro V/EEV
Displacement:6370 cc
Max. torque:1120 Nm at 1300 rpm
Cylinders/arrangement:6/in-line
Transmission:VOITH DIWA 5.0, 4-speed
Engine - vertically
mounted:
OM 926 LA, 210 kW (286 hp),
Euro V/EEV
Displacement:7200 cc
Max. torque:1120 Nm at 1300 rpm
Cylinders:6
Transmission:VOITH D 854.3, 4-speed
Engine - vertically
mounted:
OM 457 LA, 220 kW (299 hp),
Euro V/EEV
Displacement:11,967 cc
Max. torque:1250 Nm at 1100 rpm
Cylinders:6
Transmission:ZF Ecolife 6-speed
automatic transmission
Front axle:ZF, independent suspension



New Citaro, 3 doors
in urban and rural-service versions

- Technical data -

Length:12,105 mm
Width:2550 mm
Height:3009 mm to 3180 mm
(according to specification)
Passenger capacity
total:
104 to 106 (depending on version,
vertically/horizontally mounted engine)
of which seated:26 or 32
of which standing:78 or 74
Engine - horizontally
mounted::
OM 906 hLA, 210 kW (286 hp),
Euro V/EEV
Displacement:6370 cc
Max. torque:1120 Nm at 1300 rpm
Cylinders/arrangement:6/in-line
Transmission:VOITH DIWA 5.0, 4-speed
Engine - vertically
mounted:
OM 926 LA, 210 kW (286 hp),
Euro V/EEV
Displacement:7200 cc
Max. torque:1120 Nm at 1300 rpm
Cylinders:6
Transmission:VOITH D 854.3, 4-speed
Engine - vertically
mounted:
OM 457 LA, 220 kW (299 hp),
Euro V/EEV
Displacement:11,967 cc
Max. torque:1250 Nm at 1100 rpm
Cylinders:6
Transmission:ZF Ecolife 6-speed
automatic transmission
Front axle:ZF, independent suspension



Citaro G (articulated), 3 doors/4 doors
in urban and rural-service versions

- Technical data -

Length:18,095 mm
Width:2550 mm
Height:3009 mm to 3180 mm
(according to specification)
Passenger capacity
total:
156 to 159 (depending on version,
vertically/horizontally mounted engine)
of which seated:37 or 47
of which standing:119 or 111
Engine - horizontally
mounted::
OM 457 hLA, 220 kW (299 hp),
Euro V/EEV
Displacement:11,967 cc
Max. torque:1250 Nm at 1100 rpm
Cylinders/arrangement:6/in-line
Transmission:VOITH DIWA 5.0, 4-speed
automatic transmission
Engine - vertically
mounted:
OM 457 LA, 260 kW (354 hp),
Euro V/EEV
Displacement:11,967 cc
Max. torque:1850 Nm at 1100 rpm
Cylinders:6
Transmission:ZF Ecomat, 6-speed
automatic transmission
Front axle:ZF, independent suspension



Photos and text:
Daimler AG
Video-Clip:
BusTV


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